Sandalwood As A Hydrosol

You know, its is considered a fortunate in India to apply the paste of sandalwood on the entire body one night before a girl’s wedding. Lots of reasons behind the ritual, one that it revitalises the skin and second that it is a ‘lucky’ hydrosol.

The health benefits of Sandal Wood Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties like anti septic, anti inflammatory, anti phlogistic, anti spasmodic, astringent, cicatrisant, carminative, diuretic, disinfectant, emollient, expectorant, hypotensive, memory booster, sedative and tonic.

The Essential Oil of Sandal Wood is extracted through steam distillation of pieces of wood from matured Sandal trees which are 40-80 years old (ideally it should be 80 years). The older the tree, the more is the oil content and richer it is in aroma. As far as the quality is concerned, the Indian Sandal (botanical name Santalum Album) is considered the best. There are two more varieties, namely the Hawaiian Sandal (Santalum Ellipticum), which is also priced as that of high quality, and the Australian Sandal (Santalum Spicatum) which is not that good, but is commercially more in use, since the first two varieties are not much available and hence very costly (the Indian variety is on the verge of extinction and is exorbitantly costly. The main constituents of Essential Oil of Sandal are -

  • Beta Santalol
  • Santyl Acetate
  • Santalenes

For ages, Sandal has reserved as place of dignity and priority in many civilizations and religions of the world, especially in Hindu Religion, where it is considered holy and indispensable in all the social and religious rituals and ceremonies, right from the birth of an individual till his death. In every step, sandal is required. It is offered to the Gods and Goddesses, used in decorating babies in their anniversaries, used in marriages to decorate brides and bridegrooms, mixed with the flowers and other offerings, used to embalm bodies and foreheads which is a common practice among people of many communities in India and also burnt with the pyre while cremating dead-bodies.

Sandal Oil and paste of Sandal is used in medicines, skin and beauty treatments and numerous industrial products including mouth fresheners, edibles, incense sticks, room fresheners, deodorants, perfumes, soaps, lotions, creams and others. It has some really remarkable medicinal properties.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Preparing Your Own – Hydrosol

Using of hydrosols is one thing and preparing your own one is another. Hydrosols are very light, mild and are substances to be handled with utmost care. When used in the right manner and with right quantity, they can be of wonderful benefits.

A hydrosol is a process of extracting aromatic oils from various plants. Herbal hydrosols can easily be made at home in your kitchen. They are a great way to up the aroma factor in your life. While you are making the hydrosol your entire house will soak up the smell and then you can put the hydrosol in a spray bottle and spray it everywhere as often as you like. Here’s how you can prepare your very own hydrosol -

  • Put a 5 gallon enamel pot on the stove and put a brick in the bottom of the pot
  • Pour enough water into the pot so that the water comes to just below the brick, do not completely submerge the brick in the water
  • Add five handfuls of aromatic herbs to the water. You can use one herb or several depending on what you have available. Some of the aromatic herbs that can be used for making hydrosols are; rosemary leaf, sage leaf, thyme leaf, eucalyptus leaf, lavender stem, leaf and flower, lemon balm leaf, lemon verbena leaf, mugwort leaf and flower, orange peels and rose petals. All of these plants can be used in either fresh or dried form
  • Put a stainless steel metal bowl on top of the brick inside the pot
  • Put the lid on the pot, except put the lid on upside downward so that the top of the lid is pointing down into the inside of the pot
  • Empty three ice trays full of ice into the inverted lid that is on top of the pot
  • Turn the stove on low for ten to fifteen minutes or until all the ice melts in the lid, then remove the lid that is now filled with the melted ice and dump that water into the sink.
  • The plant oils will have precipitated into the metal bowl on top of the brick. Be careful to not let the melted ice water drip into the bowl. Let the smell from the plant oils that have been captured in the bowl waft through your house. Take the liquid that has settled into the metal bowl and put it into a sterilized mason jar or a spray bottle. You now have an herbal hydrosol.
  • Your herbal hydrosol is stable for six months to one year. Spray the herbal hydrosol around the house, in your car or use it as a bathroom freshener

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Aromatherapy..Floral Waters – Best Of Friends

Whenever you hear the word aromatherapy, a picture of a person lying on stomach, with just a towel to cover the skin, and some nice fleshy and soft hands giving a sumptuous massage crosses the mind, isn’t it? Well, there is much to aromatherapy and floral waters.

Aromatherapy usually deals with essential oils that are derived from plant material either via distillation or expression. The latter method is used for fixed oils like olive, almond, sesame, etc., and also, for the volatile citrus oils which are expressed from the peel or zest of fruits mainly like –

  • Orange
  • Lemon
  • Bergamot

However, the bulk of essential oils are produced by either hydro or steam distillation. This age-old process has been modernized for industrial purposes, but those who distil plants for health purposes still do so in the same delicate manner as distillers millennium ago.

The process produces a small amount of essential oil and a large amount of water and it is the waters, the co-product of distillation, or at least a portion of them, that are the hydrosols of which I write. I must say that in authentic distillation only 20-30% of the total waters produced would be deemed therapeutic and marketed as hydrosols, whereas in industrial distillation, which produces 3-4 times the volume of water, I have known companies to sell all of it as ‘therapeutic’ hydrosols for use primarily in the cosmetics industry.

Rosewater is a hydrosol, as is lavender, orange blossom, chamomile or rosemary water. In fact the most famous hydrosol is probably witch hazel, the distillate water of Hamamelis virginiana, and a product that is available in chemists and pharmacies all over the world. Unfortunately, due to its unstable nature, witch hazel is usually diluted with 10-30% alcohol to prevent bacterial growth. Which brings me to one last salient point – the issue of stabilizers and preservatives.

Hydrosols, since they are water, just beg to be used internally – to be consumed as a beverage. We need to drink water after all, so why not healing plant waters? In my definition, hydrosols are free from any additives, including stabilizers or preservatives such as alcohol, grapefruit seed extract or synthetic chemicals. It does not make sense to drink bottled or filtered water and then add chemicals to it – the same is true for hydrosols.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Floral Waters – Sacred Solutions

The oils or call them floral waters or hydrosols are wonderful solutions to a number of health-related problems. They are highly antiseptic and amazingly mild in nature. The floral waters are used for a number of purposes.

The term hydrosol is derived from the Latin words hydro and sol, meaning “water solution.” When plant material, such as the -

  • Roots
  • Barks
  • Flowers
  • Leaves
  • Stems
  • Seeds

All of these are steam distilled to obtain an essential oil, certain chemical constituents of the plant first build up in the water. Only after they reach their maximum solubility in water, do they start to collect in a separate layer on the surface of the water (the essential oil). Many of the water-soluble plant compounds and some of the oil-soluble compounds wind up in the distillation water.

A hydrosol is the pure, distillate water that remains after essential oils are steam distilled from the original plant material. Hydrosols are usually clear and have the appearance and consistency of water. Their aroma is generally, but not always, similar to that of the essential oil, but the aroma is usually much more subtle. Hydrosols contain small amounts of essential oil. They also contain water-soluble components of the plant material that may not be present in the essential oil. The aroma, therefore, may differ somewhat from the plant’s essential oil. Some hydrosols do smell surprisingly different from the essential oil.

Hydrosols are also known as hydrolates. Hydrosols are also sometimes incorrectly referred to as floral waters. Floral waters are typically aromatic waters made with the use of fragrance oils (see our Floral Water category, but do not contain the natural therapeutic properties that hydrosols contain. Hydrosols cannot be made by solubilizing essential oils in water.

Hydrosols are gaining importance in aromatherapy because they naturally contain low dilutions of essential oils combined with the botanical’s water-soluble compounds not present within the essential oil itself. Hydrosols are generally safer for use in babies and individuals with depressed immune systems.

Use hydrosols in toners, creams, lotions, body sprays, room sprays and in place of water in most formulations. They will impart both fragrance and therapeutic benefits to your products. Hydrosols are also wonderful when used as wetting agents in clay facials. An anti-bacterial preservative should be considered for preserving products that contain hydrosols.

Pure hydrosols are more gentle and thus even more fragile than their essential oil counterparts. They do not have the same concentrated anti-bacterial properties that essential oils possess and are subject to much more rapid degradation. Even when stored in an ideal, sterile environment, the shelf life of hydrosols is limited to 6-24 months, depending on the specific hydrosol.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Hydrosols – Drawing The Curtains From History

Hydrosols are a wonderful source of the richest of nourishment. They are loaded with qualities that are enough to deal with the most chronic of problems very naturally and without any side-effects. These are highly antiseptic in nature.

The Egyptians, Greeks and Romans are all known to have made great use of hydrosols for their healing and aesthetic properties alongside their infusions and unguents. See, hydrosols have similar properties to essential oils but are much less concentrated. The plant matter used in essential oil distillation imparts an incredulously addicting aroma to its remaining water.

Now supercharged with deeply active elements from the essence of the plant, this ready-to-use hydrosol offers a misty and therapeutic way to deliver a wide range of soothing skin benefits you’ve come to expect from face and body oils. Some plants are even specifically distilled for the resulting hydrosol instead of the hydrosol being simply a byproduct of the distillation. Unlike their “essential oil added to water” counterparts, true steam-distilled hydrosols contain all the nutritional components that whole plant materials have to offer.

Gentle hydrosols are water soluble & can be used directly on the skin without further dilution. Some brands will use hydrosols in place of water when creating natural fragrances, oils, creams, balms, facial toners and other skin care products to bring even higher grades of purity to their prducts. For fun, they can also be added to the bath and even be used on their own as a light cologne or body spray on pulse points if the fragrance is heady enough.

You may be surprised to learn that many of the ‘floral waters’ available in the cluttered organic market have been made with synthetic compounds which really end up without any therapeutic or beautifying qualities. Some of these variations are produced by adding essential oils or absolutes to water and using -

  • Alcohol
  • Dispersants
  • Solvents

But, know this, the richest hydrosols are usually a by-product of essential oil production. As such, the highest quality comes from devoted distillers who, with artist-like precision, steam small batches of fresh floral and plant material strictly to produce hydrosols, such as copper stills and processed through certified organic methods. Hydrosols contain all of the essence of the plant in every drop, just like essential oils but in a milder form; making them suitable for all manner of applications where essential oils might be too strong for daily use. In most hydrosols there is less than 5% actual oil.

Hava a look at these reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Basil Hydrosol

Purchase Basil Hydrosol – CLICK HERE!

Okay, this is one hydrosol whose name was on the lips of my entire family when I returned from a walk after a minor accident, I asked them to suggest any natural antiseptic liquid (I’m averse to the chemical based potions!), Basil, all of them said in unison.

The health benefits of basil essential oil include its ability to treat nausea, motion sickness, indigestion, constipation, respiratory problems, diabetes, etc. Basil oil is also a good source of Vitamin A, magnesium, potassium, iron, and calcium.

Leaves and seeds are the important medicinal parts of this herb, which has gained prominence in recipes all over the world. Basil essential oil has been popular in Europe, Central Asia, India and Southeast Asia. The oil was extensively used for culinary purposes in the Mediterranean region and still forms the active ingredient of many Italian recipes such as pesto. It is also used in making pasta and salads.

Basil has been widely used by ancient cultures such as India for medicinal purposes (Ayurveda). The herb was used for diarrhea, coughs and mucous discharges, constipation and indigestion, and skin diseases.

  • Cosmetics: Basil essential oil is used topically to massage the skin. It enhances the luster of dull looking skin as well as hair. As a result it is extensively used in many skin care supplements that claim to improve the tone of your skin. It is also used for acne and skin infections.
  • Digestion: Basil essential oil is also used as a digestive tonic. Since basil oil has carminative properties, it is used for treating indigestion, constipation, stomach cramps and flatulence. It provides immediate relief from the gas in your stomach and intestines. It is also colic and hence is used for bowel pain.
  • Cold: Basil essential oil is effective in providing relief from cold, influenza and associated fever. Due to its antispasmodic nature, it is used in case of whooping cough.
  • Respiratory: Apart from its usage in cough, it is used for asthma, bronchitis, and sinus infections.
  • Infections: Basil oil is good for treating a variety of infections such as cuts, wounds, skin infections, bladder infections, etc., due to its antibacterial properties. It is also good for viral infections.
  • Stress disorder: Basil essential oil has a refreshing effect and hence it is used for treating nervous tension, mental fatigue, melancholy, migraines and depression. Due to this calming nature of basil essential oil, it is widely used in aromatherapy. It regular use gives mental strength and clarity.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Aromatic Hydrosols

The best quality of a hydrosol is none other than the fact that tehy have an amazing fragrance. The floral waters and hydrosols are great picks for perfume makers. They are absolutely pure and natural and in certain cases, mild.

A hydrosol is the aromatic water that remains after producing an essential oil via steam or water distillation. Some plants are specifically distilled for the resulting hydrosol instead of the hydrosol being simply a byproduct of a distillation.

Hydrosols are sometimes referred to as hydrolats, distillate waters or floral waters.The plant matter used in essential oil distillation imparts the hydrosol with the water-soluble aromatic and therapeutic properties of the plant.Unlike essential oils that should be diluted prior to application to the skin, hydrosols are much gentler than their essential oil counterparts and can generally be used directly on the skin without further dilution.

Hydrosols can be used in place of water in creating natural fragrances, lotions, creams, facial toners and other skin care products. They can also be added to the bath, and used on their own as a light cologne or body spray. Hydrosol can be added to finger bowls for elegant, romantic dinners. Examples of hydrosols are Rose, Roman Chamomile, Neroli and Lavender.

Providing you with best picks -

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Floral Waters – A Medicinal Respite

A lot of people write to me asking “Tell us a refuge from the over-dose of harming medicines”. All I could do was smile, and wondered, are they really that much in darkness. The best of nature is sealed in floral waters, an answer to any and every question.

Hydrosol is the same as floral water or distillate. It is collected after a plant has been distilled to manufacture essential oils. Sometimes the amount of oil that is produced is so small that the entire process is conducted with only the purpose of extracting hydrosol, and any essential oil will be considered as a secondary product.

Hydrosol provides wonderful therapeutic and skin care benefits, and it is much gentler than essential oils so that it can be used on children, the elderly, or those with illnesses. Hydrosols can be used with essential oils or as a substitute by applying directly to the surface of the skin.

Hydrosols are often beneficial to be used to treat eczema in an oily cream to alleviate pain and irritation. In this case, hydrosols like chamomile or melissa would be used. These ingredients are often added to aerosol sprays or a bath for the purpose of inhalation. The most popular types of hydrosols, or flower waters, are rose water and lavender, and there are many more suitable hydrosols for everyday use, like -

  • Eucalyptus
  • Thyme
  • Rosemary
  • Chamomile

Last of all, gidrosols normally contains a small amount of essential oils and water soluble plant extracts, which an essential oil does not contain. For this reason, hydrosol properties are not the same as essential oil properties, but they are quite similar. It is best to choose a hydrosol that follows what you know about an appropriate essential oil as a topical and therapeutic skin care ingredient for a number of treatment purposes.

Pure hydrosols are more gentle and thus even more fragile than their essential oil counterparts. They do not have the same concentrated anti-bacterial properties that essential oils possess and are subject to much more rapid degradation. Even when stored in an ideal, sterile environment, the shelf life of hydrosols is limited to 6-24 months, depending on the specific hydrosol.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Balsam Tolu Hydrosol

Purchase Balsam Tolu Hydrosol – CLICK HERE!

The hydrosol Balsam Tolu, many say is a blessing for the ones suffering from any kind of skin ailment. The hydrosol is known to cure quite a lot many infections related to the skin, be it sores, cuts, slits or wounds.

Balsam of tolu (Myroxylon balsamum), a tall tree native to northern South America, is found predominantly in Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, and some areas of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia. A closely related species called balsam of Peru (M. pereirae) is native to Central America farther north. Balsam of Peru was named such because it was originally assembled and shipped to Europe from the ports of -

  • Callao
  • Lima
  • Peru

But the species is not indigenous to Peru.

Both trees grow up to 35 meters in height and produce white flowers and winged seed pods. Balsam trees are tapped like rubber trees to collect their resin like gums that are used commercially and sold as “balsam.” A tree must be at least 20 years old before it can be tapped for its gum, and one tree produces only about 3 kg of gum annually. Today, El Salvador is the main exporter of balsam of Peru (exporting approximately 50 metric tons annually), and Colombia and Venezuela are the main producers of balsam of tolu. The gum has a vanilla-like smell and taste and is used as a food additive and flavoring in -

  • Cough syrups
  • Soft drinks
  • Confectioneries
  • Chewing gums

The indigenous tribes of Mexico and Central America use the leaves and fruit of M. pereirae for asthma, colds and flu, rheumatism, and external wounds. The Choco Indians use the powdered bark as an underarm deodorant. The sap of M. balsamum has documented indigenous uses for colds and lung ailments, and Amazon rainforest tribes have employed it for abscesses, asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, headache, rheumatism, sores, sprains, tuberculosis, venereal diseases, and wounds.

The indigenous use of Balsam of Peru led to its export to Europe in the seventeenth century, where it was first documented in the German Pharmacopeia. It was used as an antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agent in cases of scabies, ringworm, lice, superficial ulcerations, wounds, bedsores, diaper rash, and chilblains. In Britain, balsam is used topically for scabies, prurigo (chronic inflammation of the skin), pruritus, and acute eczema, as well as taken internally for asthma and bronchitis and to generally lessen mucous secretions.

Now have a look at our reference links -

  1. Balsam Tolu Oil by Rainforest Database
  2. Balsam Tolu by Essential Oils
  3. Floral Waters by Wise Geek

Healing Touch Of Floral Waters

Floral waters are known to be God’s natural medicine of healing and curing just about any disease, ranging right from bodily functions to the outer appearance of the magnificent human body. Amazingly natural in nature, and surprisingly medicinal in touch.

Today, most common essential oils, such as lavender, peppermint, and eucalyptus, are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the -

  • Flowers
  • Leaves
  • Wood
  • Bark
  • Roots
  • Seeds
  • Peel

All of the above are put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.

Most oils are distilled in a single process. One exception is Ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata), which takes 22 hours to complete through a fractional distillation.

Hydrosols are valuable therapeutic materials in their own right and can be used alongside essential oils or in place of them especially in cosmetic applications and for treating skin disorders. They can be applied to the skin direct, without further dilution and are particularly useful where a non-oily or water-soluble treatment medium is needed, for example in some forms of eczema where oils or oily creams seen to make the condition worse. Chamomile hydrosol would be particulary appropriate here. because of there gentleness, in comparison with the equivalent essential oil, hydrosols are particulary well suited to use for children, the elderly and people who are debilitated by illness. It is not an exhaustive list and you may well know, or you may discover, other methods.

The method is the same whether hot or cold. Add up to three to five tablespoons of hydrosol in one liter of water.For children dilute two to three teaspoons of hydrosol per liter of water to a basin or bowl of hot or icy cold water. Use a face-cloth, lined pad, cotton wool or other absorbent fabric and dip this into water. Wring out the excess and place the pad on the affected area. Once the compress has achieved body temperature, renew it and continue as required. A hot compress can be held in place with crepe bandage on joints or with cling-film on larger areas, for example the lower back.

Most conditions characterized by ‘aches’, for example earache, backache, etc, should be treated with hot compresses, while sprains, fevers, inflammations and headaches should be treated with cold compresses. Sprains and varicose veins respond very well to the ‘hot/cold’ treatment, ie start with a cold compress then alternate between hot and cold compresses over the next few days, finishing with a cold one.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry