Dill Seed Hydrosol

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Dill Seed hydrosolis an amazing natural hydrosol that is used by many all over the world for quite a lot many purposes. The hydrosol is antiseptic in nature and this quality makes this hydrosol quite suitable for a lot of therapeutic uses.

The health benefits of Dill Essential hydrosol can be attributed to its properties like anti spasmodic, carminative, digestive, disinfectant, galactogogue, sedative, stomachic and sudorific.

Dill Essential Oil is extracted through steam distillation of dried seeds and whole plant of Dill or Anethum Sowa, as it is scientifically called. The basic components of Dill Essential Oil are D-Carvone, Dillapiol, Eugenol, Limonene, Terpinene and Myristicin. Since ancient times, Dill seeds are associated with magical healing powers

Following are the medicinal properties of Dill Essential Oil.

  • Anti Spasmodic: Spasm can be very irritating and in extreme cases, can even be fatal. Spasm is a case of unwanted and abnormal contraction, either in respiratory tracts, or in intestines, or in muscles or in nerves, which may result in non stop coughs, hiccups, cramps or muscle pulls, convulsions and epileptic attacks. In extreme cases, a patient may have acute pain in intestines or may run out of breath in cases of coughs and hiccups and may even collapse. Such attacks of spasm can be pacified with the help of Dill Essential oil. It has a relaxing effect on nerves, muscles, intestines and the respiratory system and pacifies spasmodic attacks, giving quick relief.
  • Carminative: Dill Essential Oil can efficiently handle gas trouble. It does not only help remove gas from intestine, but also stops further gas formation. Moreover, it gives the gases a safe downward passage by relaxing the muscles in the abdominal region.
  • Digestive: Dill seeds have been in use as a remedy to facilitate digestion. This digestive property of Dill seeds comes from its essential oils. Dill oil promotes digestion by stimulating the secretion of digestive juices like gastric juices, acids and bile in the stomach. Its aroma also stimulates the salivary glands and thus aids in the primary digestion of the food in the mouth. Lastly, it stimulates the peristaltic movement of the intestines and helps the ingested food to advance through them, thereby facilitating digestion again.
  • Disinfectant: Dill Oil is also known for its disinfectant properties. Added in food stuffs, it protects them from getting spoiled from infection by microbes. Consumed, it cures microbial infection in colon, urinary tract, kidneys, genitals etc. Applied externally, it protects skin and wounds from infections and helps them heal quickly. It can be used in dilution for applying on scalp to protect hair from various infections, lice etc.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Calamus Hydrosol

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Calamus oil has a great name in history. The oil is known to be highly therapeutic in nature and is loved by its users. I remember, this aunt of mine who used tis oil and suggested me to apply on skin before I go to bed daily, it would smell great and make the skin supple.

A perennial plant, Calamus Root grows to a height of 1m with a spread of 0.5m. The rhizome is horizontal, creeping, cylindrical, branched and up to 2m long, with a spicy aroma; the fruit are greenish berries. Indigenous to the northern hemisphere, it prefers lake margins, swampy ditches, or marshes in a protected position. It is frost resistant, but drought tender.

Calamus has been an item of trade in many cultures for thousands of years. Calamus has been used medicinally for a wide variety of ailments, and its smell makes calamus essential oil valued in the perfume industry. In Britain the plant was also cut for use as a sweet smelling floor covering for the packed earth floors of -

  • Medieval dwellings
  • Churches

And stacks of rushes have been used as the centrepiece of rushbearing ceremonies for many hundreds of years. It has also been used as a thatching material for English cottages.

In antiquity in the Orient and Egypt, the rhizome was thought to be a powerful aphrodisiac. In Europe Acorus calamus was often added to wine, and the root is also one of the possible ingredients of absinthe. Among the northern Native Americans, it is used both medicinally and as a stimulant. It is believed by some that calamus is an hallucinogen.

This urban legend is based solely on two pages of a book written by Hoffer and Osmund entitled The Hallucinogens. The information on these two pages came from anecdotal reports from two individuals (a husband and wife) who reported that they had ingested calamus on a few occasions. None of the components in calamus are converted to TMA (trimethoxyamphetamine) in the human organism.

To date there is no solid evidence of any hallucinogenic substances in calamus. Acorus calamus shows neuroprotective effect against stroke and chemically induced neurodegeneration in rat. Specifically, it has protective effect against acrylamide induced neurotoxicity.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry