Putting Hydrosols To Use

Hydrosols are not used ofr a countable number of purposes. Hydrosols are very benefitting, they are healing and curing and highly antiseptic in nature. Hydrosols are used for skin infections and in certain cases even stomach infections.

The plant matter used in essential oil distillation imparts the hydrosol with the water-soluble aromatic and therapeutic properties of the plant.

Unlike essential oils that should be diluted prior to application to the skin, hydrosols are much gentler than their essential oil counterparts and can generally be used directly on the skin without further dilution.

Hydrosols can be used in place of water in creating natural fragrances, lotions, creams, facial toners and other skin care products. They can also be added to the bath, and used on their own as a light cologne or body spray. Hydrosol can be added to finger bowls for elegant, romantic dinners. Examples of hydrosols are -

  • Rose
  • Roman Chamomile
  • Neroli
  • Lavender

Hydrosols are available through some, but not all sellers or essential oil and natural skin care ingredients. If you simply surf the web, oyu’ll come across myriad of articles that are written on natural hydrosols.

Take note when buying hydrosols derived from citrus fruits or flowers that are usually extracted by solvents. For example, since citrus essential oils are cold pressed and not steam distilled, these hydrosols must be specially made and are very common. Jasmine ‘hydrosol’ is another example that should be purchased with caution since the oil is almost exclusively extracted by the use of solvents and cannot be steam distilled, and thus captured easily.

And, spray liberally, as it’s been said that when a bottle containing a floral water or aromatic oil is left only partially full, the oxygen that also lives inside the bottle reacts with the floral water and begins to oxidize it. This process can cause the volatile aromatic components to permanently separate (after this occurs, shaking the bottle does no good). And, like your oils, store hydrosols in cool, dark places as their fragile composition may be damaged by sunlight and UV rays. And, yes, they can even be refrigerated (not frozen!) to prolong their shelf life.

Have a look at our reference linsk now -

  1. Floral Waters by Wise Geek
  2. Hydro-sols by Natural Home Spa
  3. Floral Flowers by Chemistry

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>